Tag Archives: iPad

Google Acquires Motorola Mobility

Google Acquires The Mobile Phone Maker, Motorola Mobility

Google's CEO, Larry Page

Larry Page

If you don’t think the topic of the above headline is a big deal, you must have been living under the dirt that sits under the rock some people are said to live under. Whew, that was a mouthful!

Anywho, Apple’s huge success has been traced to 2 major factors, leadership and owning all of the toys. Or owning the company that makes the toys as well as the company that makes the batteries that make the toys run.

That’s right, I’m talking about owning the iOS operating system and the i-generation of mobile devices. Ipod, iPhone and iPad. (Sometimes I think that the oil companies own the auto manufacturers but I digress).

Until today, this deal was not quite a done deal, even though we knew it was going to happen.

Well, it did. Here’s what Larry Page had to say from his blogpost on 22 May, 2012.

It’s why I’m excited to announce today that our Motorola Mobility deal has closed. Motorola is a great American tech company that has driven the mobile revolution, with a track record of over 80 years of innovation, including the creation of the first cell phone. Larry Page, co-founder and CEO, Google

Read all about it in the featured article: Google CEO Larry Page: We’ve acquired Motorola Mobility

The sad passing of Apple’s (The maker of the iPhone) CEO, Steve Jobs, recently, may or may not result in some loss of leadership. Until a new leader emerges in that company, we may see a shift of focus as they strive to ‘find themselves again”.

This could not have happened at a worst time. Google is definitely challenging their market position, and with this acquisition, will at least have all of the tools (plus their Search Engine behemoth) to make a good run at it.

I love the Apple line of products but my money is on Google. What do you think?

Android Takes Over in 2011

We’ve said it before and, guess what? We’ll say it again. Diversity will win over product in the mobile wars. Why would you not believe us? You’ve seen it before. Think PC versus MAC for a minute. This in reality was operating system versus operating system.

PC has won that battle handily. Look, we are believers in making products that can be applied widely and not only on a choice few items. Apple lost the battle before it began when they made a mobile operating system that could only work on their line of products.

Sure, you do belong to an exclusive club when you own an iPhone or an iPad. The problem is that just by the nature of this club, limits are felt all around. Limits on forums, limits on support, tutorials, and ability to dominate the marketplace. The only advantage Apple exercises right now is in the applications marketplace, and that was gained through “seniority”, being around forever.

Here’s what Greg Sterling, a contributing editor at Search Engine Land, has to say about it.

Mar 29, 2011 at 12:56pm ET by Greg Sterling

Tech consulting firm IDC has predicted that Google’s mobile operating system will become the dominant mobile platform this year, achieving a global market share of 39.5 percent. The next in line would be former global leader Nokia with 20.9 percent. Apple comes in at 15.7 percent.

Windows Phones to Overtake Apple (via Nokia)

These figures are very aggressive in terms of Android’s share and Nokia’s decline. But they’re consistent with the remarkable growth that Android has enjoyed over the past year.

By 2015 IDC projects that Google will own 45.4 percent of the global smartphone market. The next largest player would be Windows with 20.9 percent — based on Nokia’s adoption of the Microsoft operating system. If that in fact happens Nokia and Microsoft’s gambit will have paid off.

Interestingly RIM (BlackBerry), just behind Apple at 14.9 percent this year, remains relatively stable through the forecast period, winding up with 13.7 percent of the global market in 2015.

I think these numbers are potentially problematic for the following reasons:

  • RIM is unlikely to be able to maintain its current position unless its next-generation OS (QNX) is radically better.
  • These numbers assume no lower-cost iPhones and only moderate success of the anticipated iPhone 5.
  • They also appear to assume Symbian’s share will simply transfer over to Windows (far from a given)

Windows Phones appear to be selling modestly well, though not in the US market. We’ll have to wait (until 2012 apparently) to see the outcome of the “Nokisoft” collaboration. Microsoft must continue to build its library of apps, which recently crossed the 10K threshold, to maximize its chances of success with Windows Phones.

Right now, in the absence of the Nokisoft phones, there no evidence that IDC’s Windows Phone market share prediction will come true.

Advertising Implications of Android’s Dominance

With a few exceptions Android devices are Google search devices and drive mobile search volumes accordingly. Google dominates mobile search today by a margin the size of the Pacific Ocean (according to StatCounter):

Recently investment firm Macquarie Group put out a research note (using Efficient Frontier data) that showed effectively 97 percent of the US mobile search spend was going to Google.

All of this is browser based search of course. And there are hundreds of millions of mobile queries coming through apps that almost nobody is tracking right now.

Yet Google is overwhelmingly the leader in mobile search share and associated revenue, far exceeding even its dominant position on the PC. In mobile display Google is also the revenue leader in the US, according to IDC — followed by Apple (with iAD) and then Millennial Media.

Too Much Success?

If IDC’s handset sales projections come true Google will continue to enjoy near-total dominance of browser-based mobile search ad revenue, which will run into the billions by 2015. (Google also enjoys search dominance on the iPhone as well.) Its ownership of AdMob will also give it a potentially dominant position in global display advertising on Android devices — though this is less assured.

At this point Android’s success has wildly exceeded Google’s most optimistic scenarios. In fact it’s so successful that Android is likely to become a target of regulatory and antitrust scrutiny at some point in the next couple of years.

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